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Compensation of a sensory deficit inflicted upon newborn and adult animals. A behavioural study.

Authors
  • Völgyi, B
  • Farkas, T
  • Toldi, J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neuroreport
Publisher
Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer) - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Publication Date
Jun 01, 1993
Volume
4
Issue
6
Pages
827–829
Identifiers
PMID: 8347832
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Somatosensory deprivation (bilateral vibrissa clipping) was performed on newborn (P1) and adult (P80) rats and, on 10 successive days starting on day 81, the effect of sensory deprivation was tested in a rectangular maze versus controls. The maze performance (the time to reach the goal-box with food reward) of the P80 animals was significantly poorer than that of P1 animals. The tests repeatedly demonstrated, however, that the maze performance achieved by the P1 animals was better than that of the controls. This behavioural study clearly revealed that early sensory deprivation induced (probably cross-modal) compensatory changes in other sensory systems.

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