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Comparison of protective effects of preinfarction angina pectoris in acute myocardial infarction treated by thrombolysis versus by primary coronary angioplasty with stenting.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American Journal of Cardiology
0002-9149
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
84
Issue
6
Pages
621–625
Identifiers
PMID: 10498128
Source
Medline

Abstract

The protective effects of preinfarction angina were evaluated in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) treated by primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and stenting. We studied 613 patients with AMI. Group 1 (n = 306) was treated by conventional medical therapies and coronary thrombolysis and group 2 (n = 307) was treated by primary PTCA supported by stenting. Each group was subdivided into those with and without preinfarction angina within 24 hours before the onset of AMI. There was no significant difference in clinical characteristics between the subgroups of groups 1 and 2. In group 1, there were differences between patients with preinfarction angina (n = 84) and those without (n = 222) in in-hospital mortality (11% vs 18%), pump failure (Killip classes 3 and 4) (11% vs 21%, p <0.05), left ventricular ejection fraction at discharge (52 +/- 13% vs 48 +/- 14%, p <0.05), and peak creatine kinase (2,106 +/- 1,637 vs 2,764 +/- 2,154 U/L, p <0.02). In group 2, however, there was no significant difference between those with preinfarction angina (n = 82) and those without (n = 225) in mortality (6% vs 6%), pump failure (12% vs 12%), left ventricular ejection fraction (50 +/- 13% vs 50 +/- 13%) and peak creatine kinase (3,285 +/- 2,306 vs 3,291 +/- 2,262 U/L). Multivariate analysis indicated that preinfarction angina was an independent determinant of in-hospital death and pump failure in group 1, but not in group 2. We conclude that the protective effects of preinfarction angina in AMI are not evident in those treated by primary PTCA and stenting, possibly because of the overwhelming protective effects of complete coronary revascularization provided by primary PTCA and stenting.

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