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Comparison of a point mutation assay with a line probe assay for the detection of the major mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase gene associated with reduced susceptibility to nucleoside analogues.

Authors
  • Clarke, J R
  • Kaye, S
  • Babiker, A G
  • Hooker, M H
  • Tedder, R
  • Weber, J N
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Virological Methods
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2000
Volume
88
Issue
2
Pages
117–124
Identifiers
PMID: 10960699
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study compares the performance of a line probe assay (LiPA) for the detection of the major mutations associated with reduced sensitivity to nucleoside analogues with a well characterised point mutation assay (PMA). Plasma samples obtained from patients in a trial of four reverse transcriptase inhibitors (MRC Quattro Trial) were tested by both LiPA and PMA at baseline, 32nd and 64th weeks for the presence of drug resistance associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene. HIV-1 RNA was extracted from plasma by the Boom method and amplified by RT-PCR prior to being tested by LiPA or PMA. Assay discrepancies were further investigated by sequencing of the RT gene. Of 275 samples available from 98 trial subjects, 246 samples were successfully amplified by PCR and analysed by LiPA and PMA for six mutations. Of the 1476 individual codons analysed, LiPA successfully assayed 1444 (97.8%) and PMA gave a result with 1418 (96.1%). LiPA failed to give a result for 32 codons from 22 samples and PMA failed with 58 codons from 38 samples. Gross differences between the two assays, in which one scored a codon as wild-type only and the other as mutant only or vice versa, occurred at 28 codons analysed (1.9%) representing 26 samples from 20 subjects. Sequencing of 22 of the 26 samples confirmed the LiPA result in nine cases, the PMA result in 11 and detected a novel variant at codon 215 in four cases. The PMA and LiPA approach to the detection of the major mutations that are genotypically associated with reduced sensitivity to nucleoside analogues can correctly detect mutations in 97% of the cases.

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