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Comparison of developmentally regulated lectins from three species of cellular slime mold

Authors
  • Barondes, Samuel H.
  • Haywood, Patricia L.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Biomembranes
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1979
Volume
550
Issue
2
Pages
297–308
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/0005-2736(79)90216-5
Source
Elsevier
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Extracts of the cohesive forms of the cellular slime molds Dictyostelium discoideum, Dictyostelium mucoroides and Dictyostelium purpureum contain lectin activity, assayed as hemagglutination activity. The lectin activity from each species binds quantitatively to Sepharose 4B and can be eluted with d-galactose. The resultant purified lectins are abundant proteins representing, in the case of D. purpureum, up to 5% of the total soluble protein of cohesive cells. The preparations from each species are similar but distinct in amino acid composition and other properties. Each purified preparation gives rise to two protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with the major band representing as little at 77% ( D. purpureum) and as much as 96% ( D. mucoroides) of the total protein in the two bands. The molecular weights of the pair of bands were different for each species, ranging between about 23 000 and 26 000. The two bands are believed to represent subunits of lectins made up of either one or a combination of these two proteins. The apparent molecular weights of the purified lectin activities determined by sucrose density gradient centrifugation were all in the range of 100 000. N- Acetyl- d-galactosamine was a potent inhibitor of the hemagglutination activity of each preparation; but there were some differences in the relative inhibitory potency of a number of other saccharides. Antiserum raised against each preparation, as well as univalent antibody fragments derived from these antisera, reacted best with the antigens to which they were raised; but showed some cross reaction measured both by precipitin reactions and by inhibition of hemagglutination activity of the purified lectins. The differences between the lectins from the different species could be trivial; but they also could be important for defining specific properties of these three species which reliably segregate into colonies of a single species when grown in mixed culture.

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