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Comparison of calculated low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) values in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men using the traditional Friedewald and the novel Martin-Hopkins LDL-C equations.

Authors
  • Schneider, Edward1
  • Sarkar, Sudipa2
  • Margolick, Joseph B3
  • Martin, Seth4
  • Post, Wendy5
  • Brown, Todd6
  • 1 Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 25802, Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Baltimore, Maryland, United States; [email protected] , (United States)
  • 2 Johns Hopkins University, 1466, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Baltimore, Maryland, United States; [email protected] , (United States)
  • 3 Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 25802, Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Baltimore, Maryland, United States; [email protected] , (United States)
  • 4 Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 1500, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Baltimore, Maryland, United States; [email protected] , (United States)
  • 5 Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 1500, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Baltimore, Maryland, United States; [email protected] , (United States)
  • 6 Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 1500, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Baltimore, Maryland, United States; [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Publication Date
Dec 08, 2019
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1089/AID.2019.0220
PMID: 31813226
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Compared to those without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -infection, those that are HIV-infected are 1.5 to 2 times more likely to develop atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and to do so at a younger age. This increased risk is due to traditional risk factors (e.g., hypertension, diabetes, smoking and dyslipidemia), but also to factors related to HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using the Martin-Hopkins equation to calculate low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is more accurate than the traditional Friedewald equation, especially at higher triglyceride levels, which are more common in HIV-infected people. Thus, using LDL-C values calculated by the Martin-Hopkins equation may improve clinical care of people living with HIV.

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