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A Comparative Study of the Methods to Assess Occupational Noise Exposures of Fish Harvesters

Authors
  • Burella, Giorgio1
  • Moro, Lorenzo1, 2
  • 1 Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL A1B 3X5, Canada
  • 2 SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL A1C 5S7, Canada
Type
Published Article
Journal
Safety and Health at Work
Publisher
Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute
Publication Date
Oct 20, 2020
Volume
12
Issue
2
Pages
230–237
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.shaw.2020.10.005
PMID: 34178401
PMCID: PMC8209409
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Original Article
License
Unknown

Abstract

Background Noise-induced hearing loss is a well-known occupational disease that affects many fish harvesters from many fisheries worldwide, whose risk factor is prolonged exposure to hazardous noise levels. To date, academic research activities and regulatory bodies have not provided any comparative analysis among the existing methods to assess noise exposure levels of fish harvesters. This paper provides a comparison of four relevant assessment methods of noise exposure, examining the results of a measurement campaign performed onboard small fishing vessels from Newfoundland and Labrador. Methods We traveled onboard 11 vessels engaged in multiple fisheries from Newfoundland and Labrador and performed extensive noise exposure surveys using the simplified International Maritime Organization method, the full-day measurement method, and the two methods provided by ISO 9612:2009, the task-based method and job-based method (JBM). Results The results showed that the four methods yield similar values when the noise components are dominated by the engine and auxiliaries (steady-state sources); when noise components are dominated by the fishing gear, task-based method and the simplified International Maritime Organization method estimates are less accurate than JBM, using full-day measurements as baseline. Conclusion The JBM better assesses noise exposure in small-scale fisheries, where noise exposure has significant variance and uncertainties on the exposure levels are higher.

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