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Comparative reproduction and nonparasitic development of Boophilus microplus and hybridized Boophilus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) under natural field conditions in subtropical south Texas.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Experimental and Applied Acarology
0168-8162
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Volume
18
Issue
4
Pages
185–200
Identifiers
PMID: 7628244
Source
Medline

Abstract

The reproductive biology and nonparasitic development of Boophilus microplus (Canestrini) and hybridized Boophilus ticks (B. annulatus (Say) male x B. microplus female) held under natural field conditions in south Texas throughout the year were compared. Comparisons between the two types of ticks indicated that the ovipositional biology (percentage of ovipositing females and number of eggs laid) of the females favored hybrid ticks during some months and B. microplus ticks during other months. However, on a year long basis, there was virtually no difference in the percentage of ovipositing females or in the number of eggs deposited by hybrid females as compared to B. microplus. The duration of each nonparasitic development period (preoviposition period, incubation period of eggs, and larval longevity) showed that both types of ticks had very similar developmental and survival rates during the year. Generally the difference in duration of each of the nonparasitic parameters was < 8 days, leading to a high degree of synchrony of the nonparasitic developmental rates between the two types of ticks. On the other hand, egg hatchability of hybrid ticks was consistently lower than pure-strain B. microplus throughout the year with significantly lower hatch rates occurring in April, July, August, October, and November. Thus, results obtained on percentage of ovipositing females, number of eggs laid, preoviposition period, incubation period of eggs, and larval longevity provide encouragement for the possible use of sterile hybrid males as a means of eliminating a native B. microplus population. In contrast, results of the egg hatchability of the two types of ticks indicate that the selective advantage afforded to B. microplus could have an adverse affect on the success of a sterile hybrid male program by making the number of hybrid ticks necessary to eliminate a native population prohibitively high.

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