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Comparative Kinematic Analysis of Hurdle Clearance Technique in Dogs: A Preliminary Report

Authors
  • Miró, Francisco1
  • López, Patricia1
  • Vilar, Jose Manuel2
  • Galisteo, Alfonso M.1
  • Vivo, Joaquín1
  • Garrido-Castro, Juan L.
  • Gutierrez-Cepeda, Luna
  • 1 (J.V.)
  • 2 Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Trasmontaña S/N, 35416 Arucas, Spain
Type
Published Article
Journal
Animals : an Open Access Journal from MDPI
Publisher
MDPI
Publication Date
Dec 16, 2020
Volume
10
Issue
12
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/ani10122405
PMID: 33339144
PMCID: PMC7765657
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
Green

Abstract

Simple Summary Hurdle jumping is part of the increasingly popular canine agility competition. Although the jumping characteristics of agility dogs have been examined in recent years, there is currently a lack of data related to the suspension phase. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the biomechanics of the suspension phase of the agility jump and to analyze the kinematic differences in dogs with different jumping abilities. Two groups of dogs competing at different skill levels and assessed as excellent jumpers and less-skilled jumpers, respectively, were analyzed and compared. Excellent jumpers showed longer and faster jumps with flatter jump trajectories than less-skilled jumpers. In less-skilled jumpers, the distance in front of the hurdle was notably greater than the distance behind it, while the difference between these two distances was less in excellent jumpers. Length and duration of the jump, maximal height of the jumping trajectory, take-off and landing distances to the hurdle, time of occurrence of maximal jump height, and time of change in back orientation essentially defines the suspension phase of the agility jump. This study presents preliminary evidence that the kinematic characteristics of hurdle clearance are different in excellent jumper dogs and in less-skilled jumper dogs. Abstract Although the jumping characteristics of agility dogs have been examined in recent years, there is currently a lack of data related to the suspension phase. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the biomechanics of the suspension phase of the agility jump and to analyze the kinematic differences in dogs with different jumping abilities. Two groups of dogs of the same height category (large dogs) competing at different skill levels and assessed as excellent jumpers ( n = 4) and less-skilled jumpers ( n = 3), respectively, were analyzed and statistically compared. Excellent jumpers showed longer and faster jumps with flatter jump trajectories than less-skilled jumpers. In less-skilled jumpers, the distance in front of the hurdle was notably greater than the distance behind it, while the difference between these two distances was less in excellent jumpers. Length and duration of the jump, maximal height of the jumping trajectory, take-off and landing distances to the hurdle, time of occurrence of maximal jump height, and time of change in back orientation essentially defines the suspension phase of the agility jump. This study presents preliminary evidence that the kinematic characteristics of hurdle clearance are different in excellent jumper dogs and in less-skilled jumper dogs.

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