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Comparative genomics of Clostridium species associated with vacuum-packed meat spoilage.

Authors
  • Palevich, Nikola1
  • Palevich, Faith P2
  • Maclean, Paul H2
  • Altermann, Eric3
  • Gardner, Amanda2
  • Burgess, Sara4
  • Mills, John2
  • Brightwell, Gale2
  • 1 AgResearch Limited, Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand. Electronic address: [email protected] , (New Zealand)
  • 2 AgResearch Limited, Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 3 AgResearch Limited, Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand; Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 4 Molecular Epidemiology and Veterinary Public Health Laboratory (mEpiLab), Infectious Disease Research Centre, School of Veterinary Science, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Food Microbiology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
May 01, 2021
Volume
95
Pages
103687–103687
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.fm.2020.103687
PMID: 33397617
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Bacterial species belonging to the genus Clostridium have been recognized as causative agents of blown pack spoilage (BPS) in vacuum packed meat products. Whole-genome sequencing of six New Zealand psychrotolerant clostridia isolates derived from three meat production animal types and their environments was performed to examine their roles in BPS. Comparative genome analyses have provided insight into the genomic diversity and physiology of these bacteria and divides clostridia into two separate species clusters. BPS-associated clostridia encode a large and diverse spectrum of degradative carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) that enable them to utilize the intramuscular carbohydrate stores and facilitate sporulation. In total, 516 glycoside hydrolases (GHs), 93 carbohydrate esterases (CEs), 21 polysaccharide lyases (PLs), 434 glycosyl transferases (GTs) and 211 carbohydrate-binding protein modules (CBM) with predicted activities involved in the breakdown and transport of carbohydrates were identified. Clostridia genomes have different patterns of CAZyme families and vary greatly in the number of genes within each CAZy category, suggesting some level of functional redundancy. These results suggest that BPS-associated clostridia occupy similar environmental niches but apply different carbohydrate metabolism strategies to be able to co-exist and cause meat spoilage. Crown Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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