Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Comparative gene expression analysis of the engulfment and cell motility (ELMO) protein family in the mouse brain.

Authors
  • Sato, Yumi1
  • Sato, Akira2
  • Mizuno, Shota3
  • Hirota, Jun-Na3
  • Fujima, Shuhei3
  • Ishii, Chiaki3
  • Sano, Yoshitake3
  • Furuichi, Teiichi4
  • 1 Laboratory for Molecular Neurogenesis, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama 351-0198, Japan; Laboratory of Proteome Research, National Institutes of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, Osaka 567-0085, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 2 Laboratory for Molecular Neurogenesis, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama 351-0198, Japan; Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba 278-8510, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 3 Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba 278-8510, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 4 Laboratory for Molecular Neurogenesis, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama 351-0198, Japan; Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba 278-8510, Japan. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Gene expression patterns : GEP
Publication Date
Sep 12, 2019
Volume
34
Pages
119070–119070
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.gep.2019.119070
PMID: 31521773
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Engulfment and cell motility (ELMO) proteins bind to Dock180, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of the Rac family, and regulate GEF activity. The resultant ELMO/Dock180/Rac module regulates cytoskeletal reorganization responsible for the engulfment of apoptotic cells, cell migration, and neurite extension. The expression and function of Elmo family proteins in the nervous system, however, are not yet fully understood. Here, we characterize the comparative gene expression profiles of three Elmo family members (Elmo1, Elmo2, and Elmo3) in the brain of C57BL/6J mice, a widely used inbred strain, together with reeler mutant mice to understand gene expression in normal laminated brain areas compared with abnormal areas. Although all three Elmo genes showed widespread mRNA expression over various mouse tissues tested, Elmo1 and Elmo2 were the major types expressed in the brain, and three Elmo genes were up-regulated between the first postnatal week (infant stage) and the third postnatal week (juvenile, weaning stage). In addition, the mRNAs of Elmo genes showed distinct distribution patterns in various brain areas and cell-types; such as neurons including inhibitory interneurons as well as some non-neuronal cells. In the cerebral cortex, the three Elmo genes were widely expressed over many cortical regions, but the predominant areas of Elmo1 and Elmo2 expression tended to be distributed unevenly in the deep (a lower part of the VI) and superficial (II/III) layers, respectively, which also changed depending on the cortical areas and postnatal stages. In the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, Elmo2 was expressed in dentate granule cells more in the mature stage rather than the immature-differentiating stage. In the thalamus, Elmo1 but not the other members was highly expressed in many nuclei. In the medial habenula, Elmo2 and Elmo3 were expressed at intermediate levels. In the cerebellar cortex, Elmo1 and Elmo2 were expressed in differentiating-mature granule cells and mature granule cells, respectively. In the Purkinje cell layer, Elmo1 and Elmo2 were expressed in Purkinje cells and Bergmann glia, respectively. Disturbed cellular distributions and laminar structures caused by the reeler mutation did not severely change expression in these cell types despite the disturbed cellular distributions and laminar structures, including those of the cerebrum, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Taken together, these results suggested that these three Elmo family members share their functional roles in various brain regions during prenatal-postnatal development. Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times