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Comparative Evaluation and Management of Dysphonia Between Adults <65 and ≥65 Years of Age.

Authors
  • Jacks, Amy1
  • Kavookjian, Hannah1
  • Kraft, Shannon1
  • 1 Department of Otolaryngology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Otolaryngology
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Dec 08, 2020
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0194599820978435
PMID: 33290166
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To compare presenting symptoms, etiology, and treatment outcomes among dysphonic adults <65 and ≥65 years of age. Retrospective cohort study. Tertiary care voice center between January 2011 and June 2016. A total of 755 patients presenting for dysphonia were included in the study: 513 adults <65 years of age and 242 adults ≥65. Data collected included demographics, referral information, prior diagnoses, prior treatments, clinical examination findings, diagnosis, coexisting symptoms, treatments, and pre- and postintervention Voice Handicap Index scores. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS to determine significant relationships between variables of interest. The most common etiologies of dysphonia were vocal cord atrophy (44.8%) in the ≥65 cohort and benign vocal cord lesions (17.8%) in the <65 cohort. When compared with adults <65 years old, patients ≥65 had a higher incidence of neurologic dysphonia (P = .006) and vocal cord atrophy (P < .001) but were less likely to have laryngopharyngeal reflux (P = .001), benign vocal cord lesions (P < .001), or muscle tension dysphonia (P < .001). Overall, 139 patients had surgery, 251 received medical therapy, and 156 underwent voice therapy. The ≥65 cohort demonstrated improvement in Voice Handicap Index scores after surgery (P = .001) and voice therapy (P = .034), as did the <65 cohort (surgery, P < .001; voice therapy, P = .015). Adult surgical patients <65 reported greater improvements than patients ≥65 (P = .021). There are notable differences in the pathophysiology of dysphonia between patients aged ≥65 and <65 years. Although adults <65 reported slightly better outcomes with surgery, patients ≥65 obtained significant benefit from surgery and voice therapy.

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