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Comparative anatomy and development of pectoral and pelvic girdles in hylid anurans.

Authors
  • Soliz, Mónica C1
  • Ponssa, María Laura2
  • Abdala, Virginia3, 4
  • 1 CONICET - Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Salta, Salta, Argentina. , (Argentina)
  • 2 Unidad Ejecutora Lillo, UEL, FML-CONICET, Tucumán, Argentina. , (Argentina)
  • 3 Instituto de Biodiversidad Neotropical, UNT-CONICET, Yerba Buena, Tucumán, Argentina. , (Argentina)
  • 4 Cátedra de Biología General, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales e IML, UNT, Tucumán, Argentina. , (Argentina)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of morphology
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2018
Volume
279
Issue
7
Pages
904–924
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/jmor.20820
PMID: 29665044
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The development of the tetrapod pectoral and pelvic girdles is intimately linked to the proximal segments of the fore- and hindlimbs. Most studies on girdles are osteological and provide little information about soft elements such as muscles and tendons. Moreover, there are few comparative developmental studies. Comparative data gleaned from cleared-and-stained whole mounts and serial histological sections of 10 species of hylid frogs are presented here. Adult skeletal morphology, along with bones, muscles, and connective tissue of both girdles and their association with the proximal portions of the anuran fore- and hindlimbs are described. The data suggest that any similarity could be attributable to the constraints of their ball-and-socket joints, including incorporation of the girdle and stylopodium into a single developmental module. An ancestral state reconstruction of key structures and developmental episodes reveals that several development events occur at similar stages in different species, thereby preventing heterochronic changes. The medial contact of the halves of the pectoral girdle coincides with the emergence of the forelimbs from the branchial chamber and with the total differentiation of the linkage between the axial skeleton and the girdles. The data suggest that morphogenic activity in the anterior dorsal body region is greater than in the posterior one, reflecting the evolutionary sequence of the development of the two girdles in ancient tetrapods. The data also document the profound differences in the anatomy and development of the pectoral and pelvic girdles, supporting the proposal that the pectoral and pelvic girdles are not serially homologous, as was long presumed. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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