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Community exercise programing and its potential influence on quality of life and functional reach for individuals with spinal cord injury.

Authors
  • Sliwinski, Martha M1
  • Akselrad, Gila2
  • Alla, Victoria3
  • Buan, Valerie4
  • Kaemmerlen, Emily5
  • 1 Program in Physical Therapy, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.
  • 2 Physical Therapy Department, NewYork-Presbyterian, New York, New York, USA.
  • 3 Physical Therapy Department, ProActive Physical Therapy Specialists, Oregon City, Oregon, USA.
  • 4 Physical Therapy Department, California Rehabilitation Institute, Los Angeles, California, USA.
  • 5 Physical Therapy Department, Life's Work Physical Therapy, Portland, Oregon, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The journal of spinal cord medicine
Publication Date
May 01, 2020
Volume
43
Issue
3
Pages
358–363
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/10790268.2018.1543104
PMID: 30475164
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Context/Objective: After an individual with a Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) participates in the initial rehabilitation process, they often experience limited access to physical therapy services and other fitness activities. The purpose of this study was to examine previously collected data for changes in quality of life (QoL) and functional reach in individuals with SCI following an 8-week community exercise program.Design: Secondary analysis of previously collected data.Setting: Community-based exercise program.Participants: Twenty-two participants with an average of 9 years post-SCI, both complete and incomplete injuries, and injury levels ranging from C2 to L5.Interventions: Participants completed an 8-week program, once per week for 4 hours that included a four-station circuit of resistance training, aerobic exercise, trunk stability, and education.Outcome Measures: Physical function was measured using the modified Functional Reach Test (mFRT). QoL was measured with the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire-9 (LiSAT-9).Results: The mFRT improved by 2 inches (±7.04) P < 0.001 and QoL improved as well, P < 0.001.Conclusion: The findings of this study are consistent with the hypothesis that a supervised post-rehabilitation community exercise program, like Spinal Mobility, may positively impact the QoL and functional reach in individuals with SCI.

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