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Common vs. rare allele hypotheses for complex diseases.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current Opinion in Genetics & Development
Publisher
Elsevier
Volume
19
Issue
3
Pages
212–219
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.gde.2009.04.010
Source
Frazer Lab
License
Unknown

Abstract

There has been growing debate over the nature of the genetic contribution to individual susceptibility to common complex diseases such as diabetes, osteoporosis, and cancer. The Common Disease, Common Variant (CDCV) hypothesis argues that genetic variations with appreciable frequency in the population at large, but relatively low penetrance (or the probability that a carrier of the relevant variants will express the disease), are the major contributors to genetic susceptibility to common diseases. The Common Disease, Rare Variant (CDRV) hypothesis, on the contrary, argues that multiple rare DNA sequence variations, each with relatively high penetrance, are the major contributors to genetic susceptibility to common diseases. Both hypotheses have their place in current research efforts.

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