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The combination of angiogenesis and blood vessel invasion as a prognostic indicator in primary breast cancer.

Authors
  • Kato, T
  • Kameoka, S
  • Kimura, T
  • Nishikawa, T
  • Kobayashi, M
Type
Published Article
Journal
British journal of cancer
Publication Date
Jun 16, 2003
Volume
88
Issue
12
Pages
1900–1908
Identifiers
PMID: 12799634
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study was undertaken to examine the interaction between the combination of angiogenesis and blood vessel invasion (BVI) and haematogenous metastasis, and to determine the prognostic significance of that combination in predicting 20-year relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) rates in primary breast cancer. Five hundred and nine patients were studied. We investigated 11 factors, including average microvessel count (AMC)/BVI, lymph-node status (n), clinical tumour size (T), histological grade (HG), lymphatic vessel invasion (LVI), p53, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), c-erbB-2, mitotic index (MI), apoptotic index, and tumour necrosis (TN). Blood vessel invasion was detected by both factor VIII-related antigen and elastica van Gieson staining. To evaluate the best objective method to quantify microvessel density in angiogenesis, AMC was employed. The rate of AMC-high and BVI-positive tumours was 32.6 and 29.3%, respectively. That of both AMC-high and BVI-positive tumours was 10.1%. Univariate analysis showed that AMC/BVI, n, T, HG, LVI, p53, PCNA, MI, and TN were significantly predictive of RFS and OS. By multivariate analysis, AMC/BVI was the strongest independent prognostic factor for 20-year RFS (relative risk (RR)=5.5; P<0.0001) and for 20-year OS (RR=4.3; P<0.0001). Lymph-node status was still considered a powerful prognostic indicator; however, the combination of AMC and BVI provided more reliable prognostic information than lymph-node status for haematogenous dissemination.

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