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Color vision in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

Authors
  • Kelling, Angela S.1, 2
  • Snyder, Rebecca J.1
  • Marr, M. Jackson2
  • Bloomsmith, Mollie A.2
  • Gardner, Wendy1
  • Maple, Terry L.2
  • 1 Zoo Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia , Atlanta (Georgia)
  • 2 Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Psychology, 654 Cherry Street, Atlanta, GA, 30332-0170 , Atlanta
Type
Published Article
Journal
Learning & Behavior
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
May 01, 2006
Volume
34
Issue
2
Pages
154–161
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3758/BF03193191
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Hue discrimination abilities of giant pandas were tested, controlling for brightness. Subjects were 2 adult giant pandas (1 male and 1 female). A simultaneous discrimination procedure without correction was used. In five tasks, white, black, and five saturations each of green, blue, and red served as positive stimuli that were paired with one or two comparison stimuli consisting of 16 saturations of gray. To demonstrate discrimination, the subjects were required to choose the positive stimulus in 16 of 20 trials (80% correct) for three consecutive sessions. Both subjects reached criterion for green and red. The female subject also reached criterion for blue. The male was not tested for blue. This study is a systematic replication of Bacon and Burghardt’s (1976) color discrimination experiment on black bears. The results suggest that color vision in the giant panda is comparable to that of black bears and other carnivores that are not strictly nocturnal.

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