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The co-design, implementation and evaluation of a serious board game ‘PlayDecide patient safety’ to educate junior doctors about patient safety and the importance of reporting safety concerns

Authors
  • Ward, Marie1
  • Ní Shé, Éidín1
  • De Brún, Aoife1
  • Korpos, Christian1
  • Hamza, Moayed1
  • Burke, Elaine2
  • Duffy, Ann3
  • Egan, Karen4
  • Geary, Una2
  • Holland, Catherine5
  • O’Grady, Julie2
  • Robinson, Karen6
  • Smith, Alan7
  • Watson, Alan7
  • McAuliffe, Eilish6
  • 1 School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems, College of Health Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland , Dublin 4 (Ireland)
  • 2 St. James’s Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland , Dublin 8 (Ireland)
  • 3 Clinical Risk, State Claims Agency, Grand Canal Street, Dublin 2, Ireland , Dublin 2 (Ireland)
  • 4 Patient Representative, Patient and Public Involvement in Healthcare at Health Service, Dublin 2, Ireland , Dublin 2 (Ireland)
  • 5 Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Eccles Street, Dublin 7, Ireland , Dublin 7 (Ireland)
  • 6 Health Sciences Centre, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems, College of Health Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland , Dublin 4 (Ireland)
  • 7 St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin 4, Ireland , Dublin 4 (Ireland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMC Medical Education
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Jun 25, 2019
Volume
19
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s12909-019-1655-2
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

BackgroundWe believe junior doctors are in a unique position in relation to reporting of incidents and safety culture. They are still in training and are also ‘fresh eyes’ on the system providing valuable insights into what they perceive as safe and unsafe behaviour. The aim of this study was to co-design and implement an embedded learning intervention – a serious board game – to educate junior doctors about patient safety and the importance of reporting safety concerns, while at the same time shaping a culture of responsiveness from senior medical staff.MethodsA serious game based on the PlayDecide framework was co-designed and implemented in two large urban acute teaching hospitals. To evaluate the educational value of the game voting on the position statements was recorded at the end of each game by a facilitator who also took notes after the game of key themes that emerged from the discussion. A sample of players were invited on a voluntary basis to take part in semi-structured interviews after playing the game using Flanagan’s Critical Incident Technique. A paper-based questionnaire on ‘Safety Concerns’ was developed and administered to assess pre-and post-playing the game reporting behaviour. Dissemination workshops were held with senior clinicians to promote more inclusive leadership behaviours and responsiveness to junior doctors raising of safety concerns from senior clinicians.ResultsThe game proved to be a valuable patient safety educational tool and proved effective in encouraging deep discussion on patient safety. There was a significant change in the reporting behaviour of junior doctors in one of the hospitals following the intervention.ConclusionIn healthcare, limited exposure to patient safety training and narrow understanding of safety compromise patients lives. The existing healthcare system needs to value the role that junior doctors and others could play in shaping a positive safety culture where reporting of all safety concerns is encouraged. Greater efforts need to be made at hospital level to develop a more pro-active safe and just culture that supports and encourages junior doctors and ultimately all doctors to understand and speak up about safety concerns.

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