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Clinicopathological differences in attached versus loose infarcted epiploic appendages: an analysis of 52 cases.

Authors
  • Dignan, Caroline1
  • Senior, Adya1
  • Gonzalez, Raul S2
  • 1 Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA.
  • 2 Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA [email protected] , (Israel)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Clinical Pathology
Publisher
BMJ
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2022
Volume
75
Issue
4
Pages
279–281
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/jclinpath-2021-207411
PMID: 33649139
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Epiploic appendages are fatty peritoneal structures on the external surface of the colon that can infarct and become necrotic in situ or autoamputate. To describe clinicopathological features of infarcted epiploic appendages (IEAs). We reviewed 52 IEAs from 49 patients, recording numerous clinical and pathological characteristics, which were compared across attached and loose IEAs. Twenty-seven IEAs were attached, and 23 were loose; location was unclear in 2. Most were incidental; 3 attached cases caused 'appendagitis'. Most (31, 60%) had a classic 'egg-like' appearance. Common findings included fat necrosis (84%), calcification (67%) and fibrosis (58%). Attached cases had a larger mean size (1.8 cm vs 1.3 cm, p=0.030) and were more often haemorrhagic (37% vs 4%, p=0.0064) and inflamed (67% vs 13%, p=0.0002). Loose cases were more often necrotic (100% vs 74%, p=0.011). IEAs have different morphology whether they remain attached to peritoneum or become necrotic and detached. Attached cases may cause symptoms. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2022. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

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