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Clinical utility of hereditary cancer panel testing: Impact of PALB2, ATM, CHEK2, NBN, BRIP1, RAD51C, and RAD51D results on patient management and adherence to provider recommendations.

Authors
  • Vysotskaia, Valentina1
  • Kaseniit, K Eerik2
  • Bucheit, Leslie1
  • Ready, Kaylene1
  • Price, Kristin3
  • Johansen Taber, Katherine1
  • 1 Myriad Women's Health, South San Francisco, California.
  • 2 Myriad Genetics, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  • 3 Counsyl, Inc., South San Fancisco, California.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2020
Volume
126
Issue
3
Pages
549–558
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/cncr.32572
PMID: 31682005
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Although management guidelines exist for several genes associated with a 2-fold to 5-fold increase in the relative risk for certain cancers, the value of testing for them remains controversial. De-identified personal and family history data for 654 individuals with pathogenic variants (PVs) in PALB2, ATM, CHEK2, NBN, BRIP1, RAD51C, and/or RAD51D were analyzed for pretest and post-test candidacy for guideline-recommended management of cancer risk. These individuals were invited to complete a survey about provider recommendations and their adherence. Twenty-four percent of CHEK2, ATM, PALB2, or NBN PV carriers were appropriate for consideration of annual breast magnetic resonance imaging screening before genetic testing, with the remaining 76% appropriate only after testing. No BRIP1, RAD51C, or RAD51D PV carriers were appropriate for consideration of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy before genetic testing; 100% were appropriate only after testing. Seventeen percent of CHEK2 PV carriers were appropriate for earlier and more frequent colonoscopy before genetic testing, with the remaining 83% appropriate only after testing. Provider recommendations for annual breast magnetic resonance imaging, consideration of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy, and earlier and more frequent colonoscopy were reported by 42%, 26%, and 66% of breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancer risk PV carriers, respectively, before genetic testing, versus 82%, 79%, and 81%, respectively, after testing. Nearly all respondents had planned or undertaken provider-recommended management. Testing for PALB2, ATM, CHEK2, NBN, BRIP1, RAD51C, and RAD51D changed management for those carrying PVs. Provider recommendations were aligned with guidelines, and patients adhered to recommendations, both of which are critical for reducing both long-term cancer morbidity and mortality. © 2019 Myriad Genetics, Inc. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

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