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Clinical review: Sleep measurement in critical care patients: research and clinical implications

Authors
  • Bourne, Richard S1
  • Minelli, Cosetta2
  • Mills, Gary H1
  • Kandler, Rosalind3
  • 1 Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Critical Care Directorate, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, Sheffield, S10 2JF, UK , Sheffield
  • 2 Respiratory Epidemiology & Public Health Group, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Emmanuel Kaye Building, Manresa Road, London, SW3 6LR, UK , London
  • 3 Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Neurosciences Department, Glossop Road, Sheffield, S10 2JF, UK , Sheffield
Type
Published Article
Journal
Critical Care
Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Aug 22, 2007
Volume
11
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/cc5966
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Sleep disturbances are common in critically ill patients and have been characterised by numerous studies using polysomnography. Issues regarding patient populations, monitoring duration and timing (nocturnal versus continuous), as well as practical problems encountered in critical care studies using polysomnography are considered with regard to future interventional studies on sleep. Polysomnography is the gold standard in objectively measuring the quality and quantity of sleep. However, it is difficult to undertake, particularly in patients recovering from critical illness in an acute-care area. Therefore, other objective (actigraphy and bispectral index) and subjective (nurse or patient assessment) methods have been used in other critical care studies. Each of these techniques has its own particular advantages and disadvantages. We use data from an interventional study to compare agreement between four of these alternative techniques in the measurement of nocturnal sleep quantity. Recommendations for further developments in sleep monitoring techniques for research and clinical application are made. Also, methodological problems in studies validating various sleep measurement techniques are explored.Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN47578325.

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