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Clinical relevance of an intervention assessed by a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

Authors
  • Palazón-Bru, Antonio1
  • Moscardo-Descalzo, Alba2
  • Morales-Gabriel, Sergio2
  • Folgado-de la Rosa, David Manuel2
  • Mares-García, Emma2
  • Carbonell-Torregrosa, María de Los Ángel...2
  • Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco2
  • 1 Department of Clinical Medicine, Miguel Hernández University, San Juan de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Spain)
  • 2 Department of Clinical Medicine, Miguel Hernández University, San Juan de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. , (Spain)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of clinical epidemiology
Publication Date
Dec 14, 2020
Volume
132
Pages
46–50
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2020.12.010
PMID: 33333167
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Many meta-analyses usually omit the number needed to treat, or perform the calculation incorrectly, despite its importance in clinical decision-making. Accordingly, we will explain in an easily understandable way how to perform this procedure to assess the clinical relevance of the intervention. The expressions of the Cochrane Library and the concepts of clinical relevance and evidence-based medicine were applied. Simple cutoff points were also established to facilitate the task of interpreting results. The method was applied to two published meta-analyses to illustrate its application to real cases (treatment nonadherence). In the first example, with a risk in the control group ranging from 0.22 to 0.70, sending mobile phone messages to remind chronic patients to take their medication is clinically relevant with a high degree of evidence. For the second example (single-pill regimen in patients suffering from hypertension and/or dyslipidemia after 6 months), the range of the assumed control risk was between 0.28 and 0.57. The constructed algorithm could be applied to published meta-analyses or incorporated systematically in all meta-analyses with these characteristics. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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