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Clinical and molecular evidence of accelerated ageing following very preterm birth

Authors
  • Parkinson, JRC
  • Emsley, R
  • Adkins, JLT
  • Longford, N
  • Ozanne, SE
  • Holmes, E
  • Modi, N
Publication Date
Oct 16, 2019
Source
Spiral - Imperial College Digital Repository
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The mechanisms responsible for the associations between very preterm birth and a higher risk of poor cardiovascular and metabolic health in adult life are unknown. METHODS: Here, we compare the clinical and molecular phenotypes of healthy, normal-weight young adults (18-27 years), born very preterm (<33 weeks gestational age (GA)) and at full-term (37-42 weeks GA). Outcomes included whole-body MRI, hepatic and muscle 1H MRS, blood pressure measurements and telomere length. RESULTS: We recruited 156 volunteers, 69 preterm (45 women; 24 men) and 87 born at full-term (45 women; 42 men). Preterm individuals had a significantly altered blood pressure profile, including higher systolic blood pressure (SBP mmHg: preterm men 133.4 ± 10.1, term men 23.0 ± 6.9; preterm women 124.3 ± 7.1, term women 118.4 ± 8.0, p < 0.01 for all). Furthermore, preterm men had fewer long telomeres (145-48.5 kb: preterm men 14.1 ± 0.9%, term men 17.8 ± 1.1%, p < 0.05; 48.5-8.6 kb: preterm men 28.2 ± 2.6, term men 37.0 ± 2.4%, p < 0.001) and a higher proportion of shorter telomeres (4.2-1.3 kb: preterm men 40.4 ± 3.5%, term men 29.9 ± 3.2%, p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that healthy young adults born very preterm manifest clinical and molecular evidence of accelerated ageing.

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