Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Clinical and cost-effectiveness of teen online problem-solving for adolescents who have survived an acquired brain injury in the UK: protocol for a randomised, controlled feasibility study (TOPS-UK).

Authors
  • Limond, Jenny1
  • Wade, Shari L2
  • Vickery, Patricia Jane3
  • Jeffery, A4
  • Warren, Fiona C5
  • Hawton, Annie1
  • Smithson, Janet1
  • Ford, Tamsin1
  • Haworth, Sarah6
  • Adlam, Anna-Lynne Ruth7
  • 1 University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
  • 2 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, UK.
  • 3 Peninsula Clinical Trials Unit, Plymouth University, Plymouth, UK.
  • 4 Peninsula Clinical Trials Unit, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, Devon, UK.
  • 5 University of Exeter Medical School, Institute of Health Research, Exeter, UK.
  • 6 Patient Representative, Exeter, UK.
  • 7 Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMJ Open
Publisher
BMJ
Publication Date
Aug 22, 2019
Volume
9
Issue
8
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-029349
PMID: 31444185
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Paediatric acquired brain injury is a leading cause of mortality in children in the UK. Improved treatment during the acute phase has led to increased survival rates, although with life-long morbidity in terms of social and emotional functioning. This is the protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial with an embedded qualitative study and feasibility economic evaluation. If feasible, a later definitive trial will test the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an online intervention to enhance problem solving ability versus treatment as usual. Twenty-five adolescents and their families identified by primary or secondary care clinicians at participating UK National Health Service Trusts will be recruited and individually randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive the online intervention or treatment as usual. Participants will be followed up by online questionnaires 17 weeks after randomisation to capture acceptability of the study and intervention and resource use data. Qualitative interviews will capture participants' and clinicians' experiences of the study. This study has been granted ethical approval by the South West-Exeter Research Ethics Committee (ref 17/SW/0083). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and will inform the design of a larger trial. ISRCTN10906069. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY. Published by BMJ.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times