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Clinical characteristics, risk factors, immune status and prognosis of secondary infection of sepsis: a retrospective observational study

Authors
  • Chen, Yao1
  • Hu, Yanyan1
  • Zhang, Jin1
  • Shen, Yue2
  • Huang, Junling1
  • Yin, Jun1
  • Wang, Ping1
  • Fan, Ying1
  • Wang, Jianli1
  • Lu, Su1
  • Yang, Yilin1
  • Yan, Lei1
  • Li, Keyong3
  • Song, Zhenju1
  • Tong, Chaoyang1
  • Du, Shilin1
  • 1 Fudan University, Department of Emergency Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai, 200032, China , Shanghai (China)
  • 2 Fudan University, Department of Gastroenterology, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai, 200032, China , Shanghai (China)
  • 3 University of Virginia School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Charlottesville, Virginia, 22908, USA , Virginia (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMC Anesthesiology
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Oct 18, 2019
Volume
19
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s12871-019-0849-9
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

BackgroundSecondary infection has a higher incidence in septic patients and affects clinical outcomes. This study aims to investigate the clinical characteristics, risk factors, immune status and prognosis of secondary infection of sepsis.MethodsA four-year retrospective study was carried out in Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, enrolling septic patients admitted between January, 2014 and January, 2018. Clinical data were acquired from medical records. CD14+ monocyte human leukocyte antigen-D related (HLA-DR) expression and serum cytokines levels were measured by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) respectively.ResultsA total of 297 septic patients were enrolled, 92 of whom developed 150 cases of secondary infections. Respiratory tract was the most common site of secondary infection (n = 84, 56%) and Acinetobacter baumanii the most commonly isolated pathogen (n = 40, 31%). Urinary and deep venous catheterization increased the risk of secondary infection. Lower HLA-DR expression and elevated IL-10 level were found in secondary infection group. The expected prolonged in-hospital stay owing to secondary infection was 4.63 ± 1.87 days. Secondary infection was also associated with higher in-hospital, 30-day and 90-day mortality. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Log-rank test revealed that secondary infection group had worse survival between day 15 and day 90.ConclusionsUrinary and deep venous catheterization increased the risk of secondary infection, in which underlying immunosuppression might also play a role. Secondary infection affected the prognosis of septic patients and prolonged in-hospital length of stay.

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