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Clinical application of microsampling versus conventional sampling techniques in the quantitative bioanalysis of antibiotics: a systematic review.

Authors
  • Guerra Valero, Yarmarly C1
  • Wallis, Steven C1
  • Lipman, Jeffrey1, 2, 3
  • Stove, Christophe4
  • Roberts, Jason A1, 2, 5, 6
  • Parker, Suzanne L1
  • 1 UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Laboratory of Toxicology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 5 Department of Pharmacy, Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 6 Centre for Translational Anti-infective Pharmacodynamics, School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Bioanalysis
Publisher
"Future Science, LTD"
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2018
Volume
10
Issue
6
Pages
407–423
Identifiers
DOI: 10.4155/bio-2017-0269
PMID: 29451394
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Conventional sampling techniques for clinical pharmacokinetic studies often require the removal of large blood volumes from patients. This can result in a physiological or emotional burden, particularly for neonates or pediatric patients. Antibiotic pharmacokinetic studies are typically performed on healthy adults or general ward patients. These may not account for alterations to a patient's pathophysiology and can lead to suboptimal treatment. Microsampling offers an important opportunity for clinical pharmacokinetic studies in vulnerable patient populations, where smaller sample volumes can be collected. This systematic review provides a description of currently available microsampling techniques and an overview of studies reporting the quantitation and validation of antibiotics using microsampling. A comparison of microsampling to conventional sampling in clinical studies is included.

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