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Citizen science data opens multiple avenues for iridovirus research and prompts first detection of Invertebrate iridescent virus 31 in Australia.

Authors
  • Douch, James K1
  • Poupa, Anita M2
  • 1 Asia-Pacific Centre for Animal Health, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Building 400 (Veterinary Preclinical Sciences), cnr Flemington Rd and Park Dr, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 2 2/1 Leslie Street, Thomastown, Victoria 3074, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
May 15, 2021
Volume
183
Pages
107619–107619
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jip.2021.107619
PMID: 34004165
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

From citizen science data we report the first records of blue to violet-colored oniscideans (Oniscidea: Isopoda), indicating potential invertebrate iridescent virus (IIV; Betairidovirinae: Iridoviridae) infection: in Africa, South America, and Oceania; and of the new hosts Armadillidium nasatum and Balloniscus sellowii. DNA sequencing of indigo Porcellio scaber confirms the presence of Invertebrate iridescent virus 31 in Australia. Beyond the Oniscidea, new, putative IIV hosts are identified: hoverfly pupae (Eristalinae), a tortrix moth larva (Phaecasiophora niveiguttana), and a millipede (Harpaphe haydeniana). In addition, the purported positive correlation between virion diameter and wavelength of iridescence is analyzed qualitatively for the first time. Copyright © 2021. Published by Elsevier Inc.

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