Affordable Access

deepdyve-link deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Citation rate and perceived subject bias in the amphibian-decline literature.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Conservation Biology
1523-1739
Publisher
Wiley Blackwell (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Volume
25
Issue
1
Pages
195–199
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2010.01591.x
PMID: 21251072
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

As a result of global declines in amphibian populations, interest in the conservation of amphibians has grown. This growth has been fueled partially by the recent discovery of other potential causes of declines, including chytridiomycosis (the amphibian chytrid, an infectious disease) and climate change. It has been proposed that researchers have shifted their focus to these novel stressors and that other threats to amphibians, such as habitat loss, are not being studied in proportion to their potential effects. We tested the validity of this proposal by reviewing the literature on amphibian declines, categorizing the primary topic of articles within this literature (e.g., habitat loss or UV-B radiation) and comparing citation rates among articles on these topics and impact factors of journals in which the articles were published. From 1990 to 2009, the proportion of papers on habitat loss remained fairly constant, and although the number of papers on chytridiomycosis increased after the disease was described in 1998, the number of published papers on amphibian declines also increased. Nevertheless, papers on chytridiomycosis were more highly cited than papers not on chytridiomycosis and were published in journals with higher impact factors on average, which may indicate this research topic is more popular in the literature. Our results were not consistent with a shift in the research agenda on amphibians. We believe the perception of such a shift has been supported by the higher citation rates of papers on chytridiomycosis.

Statistics

Seen <100 times