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Circadian variations of catecholamines and blood pressure in patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism and hypertension.

Authors
  • Brickman, A S
  • Stern, N
  • Sowers, J R
Type
Published Article
Journal
Chronobiologia
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1990
Volume
17
Issue
1
Pages
37–44
Identifiers
PMID: 2350986
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The relationship between 24-h recumbent blood pressure levels and secretory patterns of catecholamines was investigated in 4 patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism (PsHP) and hypertension and in 9 patients with essential hypertension. A clear circadian rhythm of blood pressure and catecholamines was documented in both groups with lowest levels of blood pressures and catecholamines occurring during sleep. During the 24-h period of recumbency mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was correlated (r = 0.63, p less than or equal to 0.01) with plasma norepinephrine (N) in the patients with essential hypertension, but this correlation was weaker in patients with PsHP (r = 0.38, p less than or equal to 0.05). MAP was more closely related to plasma epinephrine (E) (r = 0.62, p less than or equal to 0.01) than to plasma NE in patients with PsHP. Plasma NE and E levels were considerably lower in patients with PsHP than in patients with essential hypertension throughout the 24-h recumbent period. The sleep-related decline in blood pressure and NE was less than in patients with essential hypertension. These results suggest that while the sympathetic nervous system may have a role in hour-to-hour maintenance of blood pressure in patients with PsHP and hypertension, it does not appear to be responsible for the elevated arterial pressure in these patients. Factors other than those investigated, such as obesity, alterations in sodium homeostasis of refractoriness of the vascular smooth muscle to the vasodilatory effect of PTH may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension in PsHP.

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