Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Chromosome-nuclear envelope tethering - a process that orchestrates homologue pairing during plant meiosis?

Authors
  • Sepsi, Adél1, 2
  • Schwarzacher, Trude3, 4
  • 1 Department of Plant Cell Biology, Centre for Agricultural Research, 2462, Martonvásár, Brunszvik u. 2, Hungary [email protected] [email protected] , (Hungary)
  • 2 BME Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Applied Biotechnology and Food Science (ABÉT), 1111, Budapest, Mu˝ egyetem rkp. 3-9., Hungary. , (Hungary)
  • 3 University of Leicester, Department of Genetics and Genome Biology, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK.
  • 4 Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization/Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Botany, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Cell Science
Publisher
The Company of Biologists
Publication Date
Aug 12, 2020
Volume
133
Issue
15
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1242/jcs.243667
PMID: 32788229
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

During prophase I of meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair, synapse and exchange their genetic material through reciprocal homologous recombination, a phenomenon essential for faithful chromosome segregation. Partial sequence identity between non-homologous and heterologous chromosomes can also lead to recombination (ectopic recombination), a highly deleterious process that rapidly compromises genome integrity. To avoid ectopic exchange, homology recognition must be extended from the narrow position of a crossover-competent double-strand break to the entire chromosome. Here, we review advances on chromosome behaviour during meiotic prophase I in higher plants, by integrating centromere- and telomere dynamics driven by cytoskeletal motor proteins, into the processes of homologue pairing, synapsis and recombination. Centromere-centromere associations and the gathering of telomeres at the onset of meiosis at opposite nuclear poles create a spatially organised and restricted nuclear state in which homologous DNA interactions are favoured but ectopic interactions also occur. The release and dispersion of centromeres from the nuclear periphery increases the motility of chromosome arms, allowing meiosis-specific movements that disrupt ectopic interactions. Subsequent expansion of interstitial synapsis from numerous homologous interactions further corrects ectopic interactions. Movement and organisation of chromosomes, thus, evolved to facilitate the pairing process, and can be modulated by distinct stages of chromatin associations at the nuclear envelope and their collective release. © 2020. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times