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Child Involvement in Choosing a Recipe, Purchasing Ingredients, and Cooking at School Increases Willingness to Try New Foods and Reduces Food Neophobia.

Authors
  • Maiz, Edurne1
  • Urkia-Susin, Iratxe2
  • Urdaneta, Elena3
  • Allirot, Xavier4
  • 1 Department of Clinical and Health Psychology and Research Methodology, Faculty of Psychology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Donostia-San Sebastián, Guipúzcoa, Spain; BCCInnovation, Technological Center of Gastronomy, Paseo Juan Avelino Barriola, Donostia-San Sebastián, Guipúzcoa, Spain. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Spain)
  • 2 BCCInnovation, Technological Center of Gastronomy, Paseo Juan Avelino Barriola, Donostia-San Sebastián, Guipúzcoa, Spain; Pharmacy and Food Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Vitoria-Gasteiz, Álava, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 3 BCCInnovation, Technological Center of Gastronomy, Paseo Juan Avelino Barriola, Donostia-San Sebastián, Guipúzcoa, Spain; Euskampus, Cooperative Innovation, Leioa, Vizcaya, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 4 BCCInnovation, Technological Center of Gastronomy, Paseo Juan Avelino Barriola, Donostia-San Sebastián, Guipúzcoa, Spain. , (Spain)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of nutrition education and behavior
Publication Date
Feb 08, 2021
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jneb.2020.12.015
PMID: 33573994
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To investigate the effect of involving children in their feeding process (choosing a recipe, purchasing the ingredients, and cooking) on their lunch food choice in a school environment. Quasi-experimental. Two schools in Bilbao, Spain. A total of 202 children (aged 8-9 years) participated in the study (43% girls), with 99 in the nutrition education (NE) group and 103 in the hands-on (HO) group. Three 1-hour workshops (1 workshop/wk), different for each group: HO, cooking-related activities, and NE, healthy habits promotion through nutrition education activities. Food neophobia, diet quality, cooking self-efficacy and attitudes toward cooking, and food intake and selection of the experimental lunches. Chi-square test of independence, ANCOVA, and t tests were performed. Students from the HO group selected and ate more spinach/broccoli (P < 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectively) for the first lunch; and selected more spinach/broccoli (P = 0.04) for the second lunch. After the intervention, improvements were observed for spinach liking and neophobia for the HO group and cooking self-efficacy and KidMed score for both groups. Both interventions succeeded in improving children's diet quality, but only the HO group reduced food neophobia levels. Therefore, involving children in choosing a recipe, purchasing ingredients, and cooking may promote changing eating behaviors toward healthy habits such as increasing vegetable consumption. Copyright © 2021 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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