Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Characterizing neurocognitive late effects in childhood leukemia survivors using a combination of neuropsychological and cognitive neuroscience measures.

Authors
  • Van Der Plas, Ellen1, 2
  • Erdman, Lauren3, 4
  • Nieman, Brian J1, 5, 6, 7
  • Weksberg, Rosanna3, 8, 9
  • Butcher, Darci T3
  • O'connor, Deborah L1, 10
  • Aufreiter, Susanne1
  • Hitzler, Johann8, 11
  • Guger, Sharon L12
  • Schachar, Russell J2, 9, 13
  • Ito, Shinya1, 14, 15
  • Spiegler, Brenda J8, 12
  • 1 a Translational Medicine , The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 b Psychiatry Research , The Hospital for Sick Children , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 3 c Genetics and Genome Biology , The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 4 d Department of Computer Science , The University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 5 e Mouse Imaging Centre , The Hospital for Sick Children , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 6 f Ontario Institute for Cancer Research , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 7 g Department of Medical Biophysics , The University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 8 h Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine , The University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 9 i Institutes of Medical Science , The University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 10 j Nutritional Sciences , The University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 11 k Department of Haematology/Oncology , The Hospital for Sick Children , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 12 l Department of Psychology , The Hospital for Sick Children , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 13 m Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine , The University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 14 n Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology , The Hospital for Sick Children , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 15 o Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine , The University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Child Neuropsychology
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2018
Volume
24
Issue
8
Pages
999–1014
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09297049.2017.1386170
PMID: 29017430
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Knowledge about cognitive late effects in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is largely based on standardized neuropsychological measures and parent reports. To examine whether cognitive neuroscience paradigms provided additional insights into neurocognitive and behavioral late effects in ALL survivors, we assessed cognition and behavior using a selection of cognitive neuroscience tasks and standardized measures probing domains previously demonstrated to be affected by chemotherapy. 130 ALL survivors and 158 control subjects, between 8 and 18 years old at time of testing, completed the n-back (working memory) and stop-signal (response inhibition) tasks. ALL survivors also completed standardized measures of intelligence (Wechsler Intelligence Scales [WISC-IV]), motor skills (Grooved Pegboard), math abilities (WIAT-III), and executive functions (Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System). Parents completed behavioral measures of executive functions (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function [BRIEF]) and attention (Conners-3). ALL survivors exhibited deficiencies in working memory and response inhibition compared with controls. ALL survivors also exhibited deficits on WISC-IV working memory and processing speed, Grooved Pegboard, WIAT-III addition and subtraction fluency, and numerical operations, as well as DKEFS number-letter switching. Parent reports suggested more attention deficits (Conners-3) and behavioral difficulties (BRIEF) in ALL survivors compared with referenced norms. Low correspondence between standardized and experimental measures of working memory and response inhibition was noted. The use of cognitive neuroscience paradigms complements our understanding of the cognitive deficits evident after treatment of ALL. These measures could further delineate cognitive processes involved in neurocognitive late effects, providing opportunities to explore their underlying mechanisms.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times