Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Characterization and Comparison of Injuries Caused by Accidental and Non-accidental Blunt Force Trauma in Dogs and Cats.

Authors
  • Intarapanich, Nida P1
  • McCobb, Emily C1
  • Reisman, Robert W2
  • Rozanski, Elizabeth A1
  • Intarapanich, Pichai P3
  • 1 Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA, 01536.
  • 2 Forensic Sciences, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 520 8th Avenue, New York, NY, 10018.
  • 3 Department of Mathematics, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT, 06515.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of forensic sciences
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2016
Volume
61
Issue
4
Pages
993–999
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/1556-4029.13074
PMID: 27364279
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Motor vehicle accidents (MVA) are often difficult to distinguish from non-accidental injury (NAI). This retrospective case-control study compared animals with known MVA trauma against those with known NAI. Medical records of 426 dogs and cats treated after MVA and 50 after NAI were evaluated. Injuries significantly associated with MVA were pelvic fractures, pneumothorax, pulmonary contusion, abrasions, and degloving wounds. Injuries associated with NAI were fractures of the skull, teeth, vertebrae, and ribs, scleral hemorrhage, damage to claws, and evidence of older fractures. Odds ratios are reported for these injuries. MVA rib fractures were found to occur in clusters on one side of the body, with cranial ribs more likely to fracture, while NAI rib fractures were found to occur bilaterally with no cranial-caudal pattern. Establishing evidence-based patterns of injury may help clinicians differentiate causes of trauma and may aid in the documentation and prosecution of animal abuse. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times