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Characteristics of contraceptive acceptors in Luanda, Angola.

Authors
  • Carvalho, A
  • Laudari, C
  • Marini, M
  • Faundes, A
Type
Published Article
Journal
African journal of fertility, sexuality, and reproductive health
Publication Date
Dec 01, 1996
Volume
1
Issue
2
Pages
109–114
Identifiers
PMID: 12321195
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study determined the sociodemographic characteristics of family planning acceptors attending the 3 largest family planning clinics in Luanda, Angola. Retrospective data were obtained from 7246 women who attended the 3 clinics (Lucrecia Paim, Augusto N'Gangula, and Kilamba-Kiaxi) during 1991-92. These clinics accounted for about 30% of total new acceptors per year. 2709 of clients accepted pills, 2242 accepted Depo-Provera, and 2231 accepted IUDs. Among 7128 acceptors, the average parity was 3 children/woman. The mean age was 26 years. Fewer than 5% had never given birth and fewer than 33% had at least 1 abortion. Almost 50% had 1 or 2 children and almost 80% had 5 or more years of education. Age, parity, number of abortions, years of education, and outcome of last pregnancy were significantly related to the different methods accepted. Younger women tended to use the pill or an IUD. Women aged 25-29 years equally accepted Depo-Provera or an IUD. Over 50% of women aged 30-34 years accepted Depo-Provera and 70% of women aged under 35 years accepted Depo-Provera. Use of Depo-Provera rose with maternal age. Use of the IUD or the pill decreased with maternal age. Most women at lower parities accepted the pill or the IUD and most women at higher parities accepted Depo-Provera. A large proportion of women who never had an abortion relied on the pill. Women with 2 or more abortions chose Depo-Provera. 80% of women with no education selected Depo-Provera. Women with higher education more frequently accepted the pill and IUD. Women having cesareans more frequently accepted Depo-Provera. The most popular method in 2 clinics among women aged under 20 years was the pill. Among women aged over 30 years, the proportion using the pill was the same in all 3 clinics. Findings reveal that clinics are not reaching the lowest socioeconomic groups.

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