Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Characteristics of Clinics without National Health Insurance Contracts: A Nationwide Survey in Taiwan

Authors
  • lu;, pei-jyun
Publication Date
Jan 28, 2022
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph19031517
OAI: oai:mdpi.com:/1660-4601/19/3/1517/
Source
MDPI
Keywords
Language
English
License
Green
External links

Abstract

Based on the 1978 Alma-Ata Declaration, the key to achieving health for all is primary health care, and many countries have established various comprehensive health care systems. Because of the financial toll of a public health care system, government-sponsored public health insurance is not universally accepted. This study used Taiwan as the backdrop to understand why many health clinics have chosen not to accept the National Health Insurance (NHI), despite it covering 99.93% of the country’s population. The clinics’ operational details were garnered from the datasets of Taiwan’s open government data platforms and checked against the list of contracting clinics within the NHI. Of 10,907 Western medicine primary care clinics in 2016, as many as 9846 (90.3%) clinics had signed contracts with the NHI. The remaining 1061 noncontracting clinics were distributed in urban (94.5%, n = 1003), suburban (4.9%, n = 52), and rural/remote areas (0.6%, n = 6). The NHI did not have contracts with 183 plastic surgery, 88 internal medicine, and 85 surgery clinics. In conclusion, nearly one-tenth of clinics practiced independently of the NHI in Taiwan. Their reasons for declining the contract and practices for delivering their services deserve further studies.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times