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Characteristics Associated with Trust in and Disclosure of Sexual Behavior to Primary Care Providers Among Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States

Authors
  • Stults, Christopher B.1
  • Grov, Christian2
  • Anastos, Kathryn3, 4, 5
  • Kelvin, Elizabeth A.6
  • Patel, Viraj V.3
  • 1 Department of Psychology, Baruch College, City University of New York, New York, USA.
  • 2 Department of Community Health and Social Sciences, Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, City University of New York, New York, USA.
  • 3 Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.
  • 4 Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.
  • 5 Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Women's Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.
  • 6 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, City University of New York, New York, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
LGBT Health
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2020
Volume
7
Issue
4
Pages
208–213
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1089/lgbt.2019.0214
PMID: 32311309
PMCID: PMC7301311
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Purpose: Characteristics associated with having a primary care provider (PCP), patient–provider trust, and sexual behavior disclosure were examined among men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods: MSM ( N = 4239) were surveyed regarding demographic, behavioral, and medical characteristics. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used. Results: Among 86.3% of MSM with a PCP, characteristics associated with lower patient–provider trust included younger age, Asian, bisexual, HIV-negative-not-on-pre-exposure prophylaxis, HIV-unknown, and lower medical literacy; with nondisclosure: Asian, bisexual, straight, HIV-negative, HIV-unknown, fewer partners, recruitment source, lower medical literacy, and lower patient–provider trust. Conclusion: Medical literacy and patient–provider trust are promising points of intervention to improve health outcomes among MSM.

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