Affordable Access

Changing Patterns in the Performance of Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Procedures and Adherence to Radiation Safety Practices in a U.S. Cohort of Radiologic Technologists.

Authors
  • Lim, Hyeyeun1
  • Linet, Martha S1
  • Van Dyke, Miriam E2
  • Miller, Donald L3
  • Simon, Steven L1
  • Sigurdson, Alice J1
  • Kitahara, Cari M1
  • 1 1 Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, 9069 Medical Center Dr, Rockville, MD 20850.
  • 2 2 Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.
  • 3 3 Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD.
Type
Published Article
Journal
American Journal of Roentgenology
Publisher
American Roentgen Ray Society
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2016
Volume
207
Issue
6
Pages
1350–1359
Identifiers
PMID: 27575031
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Information is limited on changes over time in the types of fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures performed and associated radiation safety practices used by radiologic technologists. Our study included 12,571 U.S. radiologic technologists who were certified for at least 2 years in 1926-1982 and who reported in a 2012-2013 survey that they ever performed or assisted with fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures. They completed a mailed questionnaire in 2013-2014 describing their detailed work practices for 21 fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures and associated radiation safety practices from the 1950s through 2009. Overall, the proportion of technologists who reported working with therapeutic fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures, including percutaneous coronary interventions, increased over time, whereas the proportion of technologists who worked with diagnostic fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures, including diagnostic cardiovascular catheterization and neuroangiographic procedures, decreased. We also observed substantial increases in the median number of times per month that technologists worked with diagnostic cardiovascular catheterizations and percutaneous coronary interventions. In each time period, most technologists reported consistently (≥ 75% of work time) wearing radiation monitoring badges and lead aprons during fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures. However, fewer than 50% of the technologists reported consistent use of thyroid shields, lead glasses, and room shields during fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures, even in more recent time periods. This study provides a detailed historical assessment of fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures performed and radiation safety practices used by radiologic technologists from the 1950s through 2009. Results can be used in conjunction with badge dose data to estimate organ radiation dose for studies of radiation-related health risks in radiologic technologists who have worked with fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times