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Changes in weight and BMI with first-line doravirine-based therapy.

Authors
  • Orkin, Chloe1
  • Elion, Richard2
  • Thompson, Melanie3
  • Rockstroh, Juergen K4
  • Alvarez Bognar, Fernando5
  • Xu, Zhi J6
  • Hwang, Carey7
  • Sklar, Peter7
  • Martin, Elizabeth A7
  • 1 HIV Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.
  • 2 George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia.
  • 3 AIDS Research Consortium of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. , (Georgia)
  • 4 Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 5 Global Medical Affairs.
  • 6 Biostatistics.
  • 7 Clinical Research, Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA. , (Jersey)
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS (London, England)
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2021
Volume
35
Issue
1
Pages
91–99
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002725
PMID: 33048879
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To evaluate changes in weight and BMI in adults with HIV-1 at 1 and 2 years after starting an antiretroviral regimen that included doravirine, ritonavir-boosted darunavir, or efavirenz. Post-hoc analysis of pooled data from three randomized controlled trials. We evaluated weight change from baseline, weight gain at least 10%, and increase in BMI after 48 and 96 weeks of treatment with doravirine, ritonavir-boosted darunavir, or efavirenz-based regimens. Risk factors for weight gain and metabolic outcomes associated with weight gain were also examined. Mean (and median) weight changes were similar for doravirine [1.7 (1.0) kg] and ritonavir-boosted darunavir [1.4 (0.6) kg] and were lower for efavirenz [0.6 (0.0) kg] at week 48 but were similar across all treatment groups at week 96 [2.4 (1.5), 1.8 (0.7), and 1.6 (1.0) kg, respectively]. No significant differences between treatment groups were found in the proportion of participants with at least 10% weight gain or the proportion with BMI class increase at either time point. Low CD4 T-cell count and high HIV-1 RNA at baseline were associated with at least 10% weight gain and BMI class increase at both timepoints, but treatment group, age, sex, and race were not. Weight gains over 96 weeks were low in all treatment groups and were similar to the average yearly change in adults without HIV-1. Significant weight gain and BMI class increase were similar across the treatment groups and were predicted by low baseline CD4 T-cell count and high baseline HIV-1 RNA.

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