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Changes in Reproductive Strategy of an Early Successional Species Penthorum chinense in Response to Nutrient and Moisture Levels

Authors
  • Yang, Yun Young1
  • Kim, Jae Geun1, 2, 3
  • 1 Seoul National University, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Program in Environmental Education, Seoul, 08826, Korea , Seoul (South Korea)
  • 2 Seoul National University, Department of Biology Education, Seoul, 08826, Korea , Seoul (South Korea)
  • 3 Seoul National University, Center for Education Research, Seoul, 08826, Korea , Seoul (South Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Plant Biology
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2019
Volume
62
Issue
2
Pages
103–108
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s12374-018-0334-x
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Variation in resource allocation to clonal growth versus sexual reproduction suggests that plants have different adaptive strategies in response to environmental conditions such as nutrient availability and soil moisture. Seeds of P. chinense might play an important role in expanding its established populations. We hypothesize that an early successional perennial plant Penthorum chinense Pursh with many seeds and small rhizomes does not increase its allocation to rhizome propagules and/or decrease its allocation to seeds under sufficient nutrient content or moisture conditions, unlike many other perennials. We performed mesocosm experiments to understand how P. chinense could alter resource allocation to rhizomes and seeds under experimental manipulation of water and nutrient availability. Like many perennials, P. chinense contained more rhizome dry mass and rhizome mass fraction under favorable nutrient content condition than with relatively low nutrient levels. However, P. chinense did not decrease its allocation to seeds under sufficient nutrient condition. It did not change its allocation to rhizome propagules or seeds under high moisture level either, unlike other perennials. These results suggest that both rhizomes and seeds of P. chinense might be important for expanding its established populations.

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