Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Changes detected in the genome sequences of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Salmonella enterica after serial subculturing.

Authors
  • Petronella, Nicholas1
  • Kundra, Palni2
  • Auclair, Olivia2
  • Hébert, Karine3, 4
  • Rao, Mary3
  • Kingsley, Kyle5
  • De Bruyne, Katrien5
  • Banerjee, Swapan3
  • Gill, Alexander3
  • Pagotto, Franco3, 4
  • Tamber, Sandeep3
  • Ronholm, Jennifer2, 6
  • 1 Biostatistics and Modeling Division, Bureau of Food Surveillance and Science Integration, Food Directorate, Health Canada, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Macdonald Campus, McGill University, 21111 Lakeshore Road, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 3 Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Food Directorate, Health Canada, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 4 Listeriosis Reference Service, Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Food Directorate, Health Canada, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 5 Applied Maths, Data Analytics Unit, bioMérieux, Austin, Texas, USA.
  • 6 Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Macdonald Campus, McGill University, 21111 Lakeshore Road, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Canadian Journal of Microbiology
Publisher
Canadian Science Publishing
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2019
Volume
65
Issue
11
Pages
842–850
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1139/cjm-2019-0235
PMID: 31356758
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is rapidly replacing other molecular techniques for identifying and subtyping bacterial isolates. The resolution or discrimination offered by WGS is significantly higher than that offered by other molecular techniques, and WGS readily allows infrequent differences that occur between 2 closely related strains to be found. In this investigation, WGS was used to identify the changes that occurred in the genomes of 13 strains of bacterial foodborne pathogens after 100 serial subcultures. Pure cultures of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were subcultured daily for 100 successive days. The 1st and 100th subcultures were whole-genome sequenced using short-read sequencing. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified between the 1st and final culture using 2 different approaches, and multilocus sequence typing of the whole genome was also performed to detect any changes at the allelic level. The number of observed genomic changes varied by strain, species, and the SNP caller used. This study provides insight into the genomic variation that can be detected using next-generation sequencing and analysis methods after repeated subculturing of 4 important bacterial pathogens.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times