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To change or not to change a multiple choice answer.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
U.S. Army Medical Department journal
Publication Date
Pages
86–88
Identifiers
PMID: 24488878
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

It is a common belief that changing answers on multiple-choice examinations is detrimental, and such action usually results in changing from right to wrong. Over the past 60 years, studies have shown that changing answers on multiple-choice examinations is generally beneficial. The misconception regarding answer changing behavior may be perpetuated by faculty despite evidence to the contrary. As a part of the US Army Graduate Program in Anesthesia Nursing process improvement program, the investigators examined answer changing behaviors of nursing anesthesia students. The results of this evaluation supported conclusions from previous studies in that the odds of students changing from wrong to right was 72% and from right to wrong was 20%. Students should be informed about the benefits of changing answers on multiple-choice examinations.

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