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The challenges of predicting transposable element activity in hybrids.

Authors
  • Hénault, Mathieu1, 2, 3, 4
  • 1 Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Quebec, Canada. [email protected] , (Canada)
  • 2 Département de Biochimie, Microbiologie et Bioinformatique, Université Laval, Quebec, Canada. [email protected] , (Canada)
  • 3 Quebec Network for Research On Protein Function, Engineering, and Applications (PROTEO), Université Laval, Quebec, Canada. [email protected] , (Canada)
  • 4 Université Laval Big Data Research Center (BDRC_UL), Quebec, Canada. [email protected] , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current Genetics
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2021
Volume
67
Issue
4
Pages
567–572
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00294-021-01169-0
PMID: 33738571
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Transposable elements (TEs) are ubiquitous mobile genetic elements that hold both disruptive and adaptive potential for species. It has long been postulated that their activity may be triggered by hybridization, a hypothesis that received mixed support from studies in various species. While host defense mechanisms against TEs are being elucidated, the increasing volume of genomic data and bioinformatic tools specialized in TE detection enable in-depth characterization of TEs at the levels of species and populations. Here, I borrow elements from the genome ecology theory to illustrate how knowledge of the diversity of TEs and host defense mechanisms may help predict the activity of TEs in the face of hybridization, and how current limitations make this task especially challenging.

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