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Challenges to Engaging Older Adults in a Group-Based Walking Intervention: Lessons From the Residents in Action Trial.

Authors
  • Olson, Jenny L1, 2, 3
  • Papathomas, Anthony4
  • Kritz, Marlene3
  • Ntoumanis, Nikos3, 5, 6
  • Quested, Eleanor3
  • Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie3, 5
  • 1 College of Medicine and College of Health and Human Development, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA,USA.
  • 2 Diabetes Australia Western Australia, Subiaco, WA,Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Physical Activity and Well-Being Research Group, School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, WA,Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough,United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 5 Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense,Denmark. , (Denmark)
  • 6 School of Health and Welfare,Halmstad University, Halmstad,Sweden. , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of aging and physical activity
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2022
Volume
30
Issue
5
Pages
788–798
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1123/japa.2021-0009
PMID: 34929662
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This qualitative research explored older adults' perceptions of participating in group-based walking programs set in independent-living retirement village contexts. Semistructured interviews were conducted with a subset of participants from the Residents in Action Trial. Data were analyzed through a combination of deductive and inductive thematic analysis. Findings were interpreted from a social identity perspective. Five themes were identified: (a) varying levels of social cohesion in retirement villages; (b) degree of shared identity between residents; (c) health, mobility, and preferred pace; (d) devotion to spouse; and (e) busy lives. When designing group-based walking interventions in retirement villages, it is important to consider community-level social cohesion and degree of relatedness between village residents. When attempting to build a sense of shared identity and relatedness between group members, researchers and policy makers should consider differing backgrounds, capabilities, schedules, and interests of participants.

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