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Central Nervous System Tumors in Adolescents and Young Adults: An Epidemiological Study from Jordan

Authors
  • AlMuhaisen, Ghadeer Hayel
  • Al-Tarawneh, Bushra
  • Al-Hussaini, Maysa
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neuroepidemiology
Publisher
S. Karger AG
Publication Date
Feb 21, 2020
Volume
54
Issue
4
Pages
326–333
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1159/000505971
PMID: 32088718
Source
Karger
Keywords
License
Green
External links

Abstract

Background: The adolescent and young adult (AYA) age group lacks targeted epidemiologic studies that assess the prevalence and outcome of tumors. We aim to provide deep analysis of the epidemiology of central nervous system (CNS) tumors in AYA in Jordan. Methodology: This is a retrospective study for all CNS tumors in the AYA group patients diagnosed and managed at King Hussein Cancer Center in 2007–2016. A patient list was retrieved from the Center’s Cancer Registry, and clinicopathologic data were reviewed individually from the patients’ records. Results: A total of 370 cases of primary CNS tumors were retrieved, with a median age of 28.5 years. Males outnumbered females; 57.6 and 42.4%, respectively. Most tumors occurred in the cerebrum (62.2%, n = 230), the frontal lobe was the most commonly affected (29%). Glioma was the most common histologic category (58.9%, n = 218), with high-grade tumors, including glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytoma, prevailing. Embryonal tumors comprised the second most common group (16.8%, n = 62). Medulloblastoma was the prototype of embryonal tumors (91.9%; n = 57). Glioma tended to affect the older age group than embryonal tumors (p value = 0.002). On last available follow-up, 29.5% were lost to follow-up, 36% were alive, and 34.6% were deceased. The median overall survival (OS) for all tumors was 47.6 months. Embryonal tumors had a better outcome than glioma (median OS 76.3 vs. 30.3 months, respectively; p value = 0.001). Conclusions: High-grade glioma affecting the cerebrum was the most common tumor among AYA age group and was associated with a less favorable outcome compared to embryonal tumors. More research is needed to address this special age group.

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