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Cell Wall-Anchored Surface Proteins of Staphylococcus aureus: Many Proteins, Multiple Functions.

Authors
  • Geoghegan, Joan A1
  • Foster, Timothy J2
  • 1 Microbiology Department, Moyne Institute of Preventive Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. , (Ireland)
  • 2 Microbiology Department, Moyne Institute of Preventive Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. [email protected] , (Ireland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current topics in microbiology and immunology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2017
Volume
409
Pages
95–120
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/82_2015_5002
PMID: 26667044
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus persistently colonizes about 20 % of the population and is intermittently associated with the remainder. The organism can cause superficial skin infections and life-threatening invasive diseases. The surface of the bacterial cell displays a variety of proteins that are covalently anchored to peptidoglycan. They perform many functions including adhesion to host cells and tissues, invasion of non-phagocytic cells, and evasion of innate immune responses. The proteins have been categorized into distinct classes based on structural and functional analysis. Many surface proteins are multifunctional. Cell wall-anchored proteins perform essential functions supporting survival and proliferation during the commensal state and during invasive infections. The ability of cell wall-anchored proteins to bind to desquamated epithelial cells is important during colonization, and the binding to fibrinogen is of particular significance in pathogenesis.

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