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Coordinated surface activities in Variovorax paradoxus EPS

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  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Ecology
  • Geography

Abstract

1471-2180-9-124.fm Jamieson, W. D., Pehl, M. J., Gregory, G. A. and Orwin, P. M. (2009) Coordinated surface activities in Variovorax paradoxus EPS. BMC Microbiology, 9 (1). p. 124. ISSN 1471-2180 Link to official URL (if available): http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471- 2180-9-124 Opus: University of Bath Online Publication Store http://opus.bath.ac.uk/ This version is made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the reference above. See http://opus.bath.ac.uk/ for usage policies. Please scroll down to view the document. BioMed Central Page 1 of 18 (page number not for citation purposes) BMC Microbiology Open AccessResearch article Coordinated surface activities in Variovorax paradoxus EPS W David Jamieson1, Michael J Pehl2, Glenn A Gregory2,3 and Paul M Orwin*2 Address: 1Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY, UK, 2Department of Biology, California State University, San Bernardino, 5500 University Pkwy, San Bernardino, CA, 92407, USA and 3Current address: Loma Linda University, School of Dentistry, Loma Linda, CA, USA Email: W David Jamieson - [email protected]; Michael J Pehl - [email protected]; Glenn A Gregory - [email protected]; Paul M Orwin* - [email protected] * Corresponding author Abstract Background: Variovorax paradoxus is an aerobic soil bacterium frequently associated with important biodegradative processes in nature. Our group has cultivated a mucoid strain of Variovorax paradoxus for study as a model of bacterial development and response to environmental conditions. Colonies of this organism vary widely in appearance depending on agar plate type. Results: Surface motility was observed on minimal defined agar plates with 0.5% agarose, similar in nature to swarming motility identified in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. We examined this motility under several culture conditions, including inhibition of flagellar motility using Congo Red. We demonstrated

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