Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Pre-Saccadic Shifts of Visual Attention

Authors
Journal
PLoS ONE
1932-6203
Publisher
Public Library of Science
Publication Date
Volume
7
Issue
9
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0045670
Keywords
  • Research Article
  • Biology
  • Anatomy And Physiology
  • Neurological System
  • Sensory Physiology
  • Neuroscience
  • Sensory Perception
  • Sensory Systems
  • Medicine
  • Mental Health
  • Psychology
  • Social And Behavioral Sciences
  • Behavior
  • Attention (Behavior)
  • Experimental Psychology

Abstract

The locations of visual objects to which we attend are initially mapped in a retinotopic frame of reference. Because each saccade results in a shift of images on the retina, however, the retinotopic mapping of spatial attention must be updated around the time of each eye movement. Mathôt and Theeuwes [1] recently demonstrated that a visual cue draws attention not only to the cue's current retinotopic location, but also to a location shifted in the direction of the saccade, the “future-field”. Here we asked whether retinotopic and future-field locations have special status, or whether cue-related attention benefits exist between these locations. We measured responses to targets that appeared either at the retinotopic or future-field location of a brief, non-predictive visual cue, or at various intermediate locations between them. Attentional cues facilitated performance at both the retinotopic and future-field locations for cued relative to uncued targets, as expected. Critically, this cueing effect also occurred at intermediate locations. Our results, and those reported previously [1], imply a systematic bias of attention in the direction of the saccade, independent of any predictive remapping of attention that compensates for retinal displacements of objects across saccades [2].

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments

More articles like this

Saccadic adaptation shifts the pre-saccadic attent...

on Experimental brain research May 2005
More articles like this..