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Wavelet analysis of near-inertial Currents at the east flower garden bank

Authors
Journal
Continental Shelf Research
0278-4343
Publisher
Elsevier
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.csr.2014.06.013
Keywords
  • East Flower Garden Bank
  • Currents
  • Inertial Oscillations
  • Temperature/Salinity
  • Adcp
  • Northwestern Gulf Of Mexico
  • (27–28N
  • 93–94W)
Disciplines
  • Musicology
  • Physics

Abstract

Abstract Near-inertial currents (NICs) often dominate the mean circulation at the East Flower Garden Bank (EFGB), part of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. The EFGB, one of several submerged coral reefs, is located in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, about 190km southeast of Galveston, Texas. The bank is about 6km wide in the east-west direction and rises to within about 20m from the surface. NICs near the EFGB are described using current data from 5 acoustic Doppler current profilers that were moored at the edges of the bank and on top of the bank for about a year. A wavelet analysis was used in order to better describe the nonstationarity of the NICs. NICs were strongest during spring and summer due to their near resonant response with sea breeze and the shallowness of the mixed layer, and exhibited a first-baroclinic-mode vertical structure. NICS were generally larger near the surface and extended to the bottom on the west side of the EFGB but only to within about 20m of the bottom on the eastern side of the bank. NIC ellipses were nearly circular and rotated clockwise above the top of the EFGB but became flatter and aligned with the bathymetry with increasing depth; occasionally, on the eastern side of the bank, the NIC vectors rotated counterclockwise due to probable effects of lee vortices arising from the mean flow interacting with the bank. Most energy input by the wind at the surface was likely transferred downward through divergence of the meridional flow against the coastal boundary. The inertial currents were at times more energetic than the mean flow, and often accounted for more than 50% of the total current energy.

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