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Not cat-scratch disease: Bartonella henselae neuroretinitis associated with non-feline pet mammals ☆

Authors
  • Orellana-Rios, Jorge1, 2
  • Verdaguer-Diaz, Juan I.1
  • Opazo, Gabriela2
  • Leong, Belinda C.S.3
  • Zett, Claudio4
  • Smith, R. Theodore5
  • Freund, K. Bailey6, 7
  • 1 Fundación Oftalmológica Los Andes, Vitacura, Santiago, Chile
  • 2 Centro Oftalmológico Láser CEOLA, Antofagasta, Chile
  • 3 Retina Associates of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • 4 Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile
  • 5 Department of Ophthalmology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA
  • 6 Vitreous Retina Macula Consultants of New York, New York, USA
  • 7 Department of Ophthalmology, New York University, School of Medicine, New York, USA
Type
Published Article
Journal
IDCases
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
22
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.idcr.2020.e00978
PMID: 33083230
PMCID: PMC7554364
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

To describe the ocurrence of Bartonella -associated neuroretinitis secondary to non-feline pet exposure, we retrospectively reviewed medical records and imaging from patients with a clinical and serologic diagnosis of Bartonella henselae (BH). Retinal imaging included color fundus photography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescein angiography (FA). Four eyes of two patients with cat-scratch disease were included in this study, with a mean age of 35 years. The mean follow-up was 13 months, after presentation of infectious neuroretinitis. Both patients suffered from bilateral neuroretinitis after direct contact with family pets (ferret and guinea pig). All patients were treated with a long-term systemic antimicrobial therapy. Visual acuity in all improved to 20/30 or better at six months. In conclusion, humans may develop cat-scratch disease when they are exposed to Bartonella henselae (BH) in the saliva of infected cats or BH-containing flea feces reaching the systemic circulation through scratches or mucous membranes. As the cat flea ( Ctenocephalides felis ) may reside on non-feline mammals, Bartonella -associated neuroretinitis may result from contact with other furred family pets.

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