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Correlates of e-cigarette use among active duty US military personnel: implications for cessation policy.

Authors
  • Godby, Sarah1
  • Dierst-Davies, R2
  • Kogut, D1
  • Degiorgi Winslow, L1
  • Truslow, M M1
  • Tuttle, J1
  • Koeppl, P1
  • Marshall-Aiyelawo, K3
  • Elenberg, K4
  • 1 Deloitte Consulting LLP, Arlington, Virginia, USA.
  • 2 Deloitte Consulting LLP, Arlington, Virginia, USA [email protected].
  • 3 Analytics and Evaluation Division (J-5), Defense Health Agency, Falls Church, Virginia, USA.
  • 4 Office of the Under Secretary for Personnel and Readiness, US Department of Defense, Washington, DC, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMJ military health
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2023
Volume
169
Issue
3
Pages
197–204
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2020-001700
PMID: 33664088
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Electronic cigarette (or e-cigarette) use has grown substantially since its US market introduction in 2007. Although marketed as a safer alternative to traditional cigarettes, studies have shown they can also be a gateway to their use. The purpose of this investigation is to identify factors associated with different patterns of tobacco use among active duty military personnel. A secondary analysis was conducted using the 2014 Defense Health Agency Health Related Behaviors survey data. Results are based on 45 986 US military respondents, weighted to 1 251 606. Both univariate and regression analyses were conducted to identify correlates. In 2014, approximately 7.8% of respondents reported using e-cigarettes at least once in the past year. Among e-cigarette users, 49% reported exclusive e-cigarette use. Prevalence of exclusive use is highest among white people (58%), Navy (33%), men (83%) and persons with income ≤$45 000 (65%). Regression comparing exclusive cigarette with exclusive e-cigarette users revealed higher odds of being Air Force (OR=2.19; CI 1.18 to 4.06) or Navy (OR=2.25; CI 1.14 to 4.41) personnel and being male (OR=1.72; CI 1.12 to 2.64), and more likely to not receive smoking cessation messaging from healthcare providers in the last 12 months (OR=2.88; CI 1.80 to 4.62). When comparing exclusive e-cigarette users with poly-tobacco users, e-cigarette users had higher odds of being Hispanic (OR=2.20; CI 1.02 to 4.78), college educated (OR=4.25; CI 1.22 to 14.84) and not receiving tobacco prevention/cessation messaging (OR=4.80; CI 2.79 to 8.27). The results demonstrate that exclusive e-cigarette users in the military have unique characteristics when compared with groups of other/mixed tobacco users. Findings can inform cessation and prevention efforts to improve both the overall health and combat readiness of active duty military personnel. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2023. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

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