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Cardiogenic hypertension in maturing dogs.

Authors
  • Magrini, F
  • Roberts, N
  • Branzi, G
  • Mondadori, C
  • Reggiani, P
  • Ciulla, M
  • Meazza, R
Type
Published Article
Journal
Hypertension
Publication Date
Sep 01, 1988
Volume
12
Issue
3
Pages
295–300
Identifiers
PMID: 3169944
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the heart can induce high blood pressure by maintaining an inappropriately elevated cardiac output/body weight ratio during growth. Direct (femoral artery) mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate, cardiac output/body weight ratio (as defined by M-mode echocardiography), and total peripheral vascular resistance were measured and calculated every 2 months in nine conscious dogs during development from 2 to 10 months of age. In four dogs a J-shaped catheter for atrial pacing was chronically implanted at the age of 3 months, and their hearts were permanently paced at 130 beats/min until maturity. The aim of atrial pacing was to prevent the natural slowing of the heart rate and, consequently, to maintain a cardiac output/body weight ratio that was inappropriately high in relation to age during growth. Five dogs were studied as controls. No hemodynamic differences were observed until the age of 4 months. From the age of 5 to 10 months heart rate was kept at 130 beats/min by atrial pacing in the atrially paced group, and the mean cardiac output/body weight ratio did not decrease (196 +/- 24 vs 191 +/- 34 [SE] ml/min/kg). MAP rose from 62 +/- 4 to 116 +/- 8 mm Hg, and total peripheral resistance increased from 0.34 +/- 0.07 to to 0.61 +/- 0.09 mm Hg/ml/min/kg.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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